NDK Mentorship Prgram | Parents & Teens’ Sexual health
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Parents are the most important sexuality educators for their children. Talking about sexuality with your children can be a challenge. Sometimes parents are fearful about saying too much, too soon (although there’s no evidence that this should be a concern). Some parents feel they don’t know enough to be a reliable source of accurate information. Additionally, when teens feel uncomfortable coming to their parents or guardians regarding difficult issues, such as sex, they often turn to their friends and/or the media in order to gain information.

Whatever your relationship to religion, it’s important that you talk with your child about sexuality in the context of your own personal, moral views.

Some of the basics

  • Parents are the most important sexuality educators for their children.
  • No parent needs to be an expert on sexuality to have meaningful conversations with their children – parents can share their values about sexuality, relationships, and respect for others.
  • Some parents believe that talking about sex will lead to teens having sex. In fact, research shows that teens who have talked with their parents about sex are more likely to post-pone sex and use birth control when they do begin.
  • Teens that have high self-esteem are more likely to make responsible decisions about sex.

Some of the topics that can be discussed

  • Male & Female Reproductive Systems
  • Pregnancy
  • Abstinence/Postponing Sex
  • Ways to Show Affection Without Having Sex
  • Sexual Orientation (Heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, transsexual, etc.)
  • HIV/AIDS and other STDs
  • Emotional Consequences of Sex – rape (such as date rape, gray rape, etc.), sexual assault, sexual abuse, etc.
  • How Alcohol and Other Drugs Affect sexual Decisions